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Sightseer
Posts: 4
Detect ISO setting from video file?
[ Edited ]

Hi all.

 

I'm a new owner of a GoPro Hero 5 Black and I've shot a few test videos. I mainly want to use it indoors (recording pool games) but even though I have fairly bright lighting (Ten 40 watt ceiling lights, and three 100 watt pool table lights) I'm still suffering from excessive grain in my image. I've turned on Protune and changed the ISO gradually from the default 1600 down to 400, but haven't really seen any noticable change in video noise.

 

I'd like to confirm if my settings really are being changed, so my question is; is there a way to detect what ISO setting was used on a particular video file. I know apps are available that will display such information for still cameras, including the ISO, but is there a similar one I can use to confirm the ISO setting on a Hero 5 video file?

Sightseer
Posts: 4
Re: Detect ISO setting from video file?
[ Edited ]

A correction and more detail to my post above. Here's the correct lighting specs in this room, which is about 14 x 12 feet:

 

Ceiling lights: Ten 50 watt lights.

Pool table lights: Three 100 watt lights.

Explorer
Posts: 12,208
Re: Detect ISO setting from video file?
Unless you lock the ISO, I don't think it's a static number. Shutter and ISO will vary as light conditions change. For this reason, I don't think you can quickly identify the ISO used by just looking at the video metadata. On a photo this is different as it's a static shot.

As far as reducing the grain in your shot, there are more values you want to mess around with to try and obtain the best shot. Firs, try selective light metering by pressing on the back of the LCD until a large white box shrinks into a smaller box. Move that box around until the picture looks right and then lock it. Be sure to hit the check mark or your changes wont be saved.

After trying that, I would try increasing the ev. Next, try Flat color instead of GoPro and see if that improves things. After that, try changing the WB. First try setting a kelvin temperature that looks best and if that isn't working, try Native.

After trying the above, you will want to lock your shutter and ISO. The slower the shutter the lower you can drop the ISO. For indoor shooting, you should be using a lower frame rate such as 24-30fps. If you are hoping to get slow motion shots, it's going to be more difficult. Assuming you are using 30fps, start with a shutter of 1/30 and lock the ISO at 100. If the image is too bright, increase the shutter incrementally, 1/60, 1/120... If the image is too dark, keep the shutter on 1/30 and increase the ISO 200, 400...

The changes above can be tried in different combinations so you have some testing to do. Some will work together and some will not. For example, you cannot set the shutter speed and adjust ev.

If you can provide a picture of what the camera will be looking at it will be easier to give advice on how to improve it.
Sightseer
Posts: 4
Re: Detect ISO setting from video file?

Thank you very much for the detailed reply.  I'm new to the camera, so I'll have to read up on locking the ISO. I've posted a link below to a short video of the room and current results. As far as I know, the ISO is set to 800 (but may not be locked if your post is correct). The Resolution is 1080p and the shutter speed is set to 30fps, which seems confirmed by Adobe Premier. This is the raw video and hasn't been edited in any way other than to shorten the clip:

 

https://youtu.be/L0mfIwmCoO8

 

 

Explorer
Posts: 12,208
Re: Detect ISO setting from video file?
Thanks for posting the video.
Unfortunately, I'm traveling so the only screen I have to view the video is on a Samsung Galaxy S7. On this small screen, your video looks good.

With that light the camera probably isn't pushing the ISO much higher than 400 so this is why you aren't seeing a difference when lowering it. Keeping it simple, put the max ISO on 400 and spot meter/light balance to the center of the table where the light is brightest. This might improve things a bit.

To get the best results, I'd try an ISO of 100 with a locked shutter and a manually selected WB. Since you have Premiere, you might want to drop the sharpness to medium or low. You can then bring this value back up in the editor as you see fit.

Professionals with plenty of time on their hands for editing would say that the best settings are:
Shutter 1/60
ISO 100
Color Flat
WB Native
Sharpness Low

Personally, I find that more work than it's worth. However, you can use it as a starting point and then work your way up as you see fit. Your goal is going to be an ISO of 100 or 200.

Sightseer
Posts: 4
Re: Detect ISO setting from video file?

Thanks again for the reply. I'll try some of your suggestions and post my results.