Ask a Question
GoPro Support Hub Ask a question. Share an answer. Find a solution. Stay stoked.
Announcements
Is your GoPro gear up to date? Check to see If it is on our Update page.
Cameras
%3CLINGO-SUB%20id%3D%22lingo-sub-248774%22%20slang%3D%22en-US%22%3ETimelapse%20question%3C%2FLINGO-SUB%3E%3CLINGO-BODY%20id%3D%22lingo-body-248774%22%20slang%3D%22en-US%22%3E%3CP%3EQuestion%20on%20nightlapse.%3C%2FP%3E%3CP%3EDoes%20the%20shutter%20automatically%20adjust%20during%20increasing%20or%20decreasing%20light%20when%20set%20to%20an%20interval%20of%20say%2015%20seconds%2C%20or%20does%20it%20stay%20open%20the%20entire%2015%20seconds%3F%20Here%20is%20a%20scenario%3A%20sunrise.%20Need%20long%20exposures%20while%20dark%20then%20slowly%20quickening%20as%20the%20scene%20brightens%3F%20Second%20part%20of%20the%20question%3A%20Nightlapse%20seems%20to%20be%20a%20series%20of%20still%20pics.%20Timewarp%20seems%20to%20be%20automatically%20creating%20a%20video%20from%20all%20the%20stills%20it%20takes.%20Do%20either%20automatically%20adjust%20exposure%20and%20is%20one%20more%20preferable%20than%20the%20other%20for%20the%20above%20scenario%3F%20BTW%2C%20I%20have%20a%20GP7.%20Using%20recommended%20cards%2C%20manually%20updated%2C%20and%20it%20actually%20seems%20to%20be%20working%20quite%20well%20indeed.%20So%20far%20so%20good.%20Fingers%20crossed!%3C%2FP%3E%3C%2FLINGO-BODY%3E%3CLINGO-LABS%20id%3D%22lingo-labs-248774%22%20slang%3D%22en-US%22%3E%3CLINGO-LABEL%3EHERO7%20Black%3C%2FLINGO-LABEL%3E%3C%2FLINGO-LABS%3E%3CLINGO-SUB%20id%3D%22lingo-sub-248866%22%20slang%3D%22en-US%22%3ERe%3A%20Timelapse%20question%3C%2FLINGO-SUB%3E%3CLINGO-BODY%20id%3D%22lingo-body-248866%22%20slang%3D%22en-US%22%3EGood%20questions.%20First%2C%20to%20answer%20your%20question%20I%20need%20to%20explain%20the%20difference%20between%20Interval%20and%20Shutter%20speed.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EShutter%20speed%20is%20how%20long%20the%20camera%20allows%20for%20exposure%20to%20the%20sensor.%20So%2C%20if%20your%20Shutter%20speed%20is%20set%20to%2015%20seconds%2C%20every%20picture%2C%20no%20matter%20how%20much%20light%20is%20present%2C%20will%20expose%20for%20the%20full%2015%20seconds.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EInterval%20is%20how%20long%20the%20camera%20will%20wait%20between%20taking%20pictures.%20So%2C%20if%20you%20have%20a%20set%20Shutter%20of%205%20seconds%2C%20but%20an%20interval%20of%2015%20seconds%2C%20the%20pictures%20will%20expose%20for%205%20seconds%2C%20but%20wait%2015%20seconds%20before%20taking%20the%20next%20picture.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EIn%20the%20scenario%20you%20present%2C%20slowly%20brightening%20scene%2C%20it's%20usually%20best%20to%20just%20have%20the%20shutter%20set%20to%20Auto.%20The%20Auto%20shutter%20in%20night%20lapse%20exposures%20ranges%20from%201%2F4096th%20sec%20to%2030%20sec.%20As%20the%20light%20increases%2C%20the%20shutter%20speed%20will%20get%20faster%20(shorter%20duration).%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3ESometimes%20the%20changing%20light%20can%20cause%20a%20flickering%20effect.%20You%20will%20probably%20see%20this%20most%20prominently%20during%20the%20transition%20phase%20between%20the%20dark%20and%20bright%20scene.%20For%20most%20people%2C%20it's%20not%20a%20big%20deal%20and%20usually%20it%20goes%20unnoticed%20until%20it's%20pointed%20out.%20Unfortunately%2C%20once%20you%20are%20aware%20of%20it%2C%20it's%20one%20of%20those%20things%20that%20you%20just%20can't%20%22un-see%22.%20Professional%20photographers%20will%20most%20certainly%20see%20it.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EThere%20are%20editing%20programs%20that%20you%20can%20use%20to%20remove%20this%20flicker.%20One%20free%20program%20is%20called%20TLTools%20%3CA%20href%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tltools.it%2Fwp%2Fen%2F%22%20target%3D%22_blank%22%20rel%3D%22nofollow%20noopener%20noreferrer%20noopener%20noreferrer%22%3Ehttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.tltools.it%2Fwp%2Fen%2F%3C%2FA%3E%20and%20it%20may%20be%20something%20you%20want%20to%20try.%20If%20you%20search%20for%20Time%20Lapse%20deflicker%20(app%2C%20program%2C%20or%20editor)%20you%20should%20be%20able%20to%20find%20other%20options%20as%20well.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EPersonally%2C%20I%20usually%20just%20leave%20my%20time%20lapse%20as%20is.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EAs%20far%20as%20TimeWarp%20is%20concerned%2C%20I%20think%20it%20uses%20the%20same%20shutter%20speeds%20of%20regular%20photos%2C%20somewhere%20between%201%2F8000th%20of%20a%20second%20and%20around%201%2F60th%20of%20a%20second.%20So%20for%20what%20you%20have%20described%2C%20I%20don't%20think%20you%20will%20get%20enough%20exposure%20during%20the%20dark%20scenes.%20The%20benefit%20of%20TimeWarp%2C%20of%20course%2C%20is%20it%20will%20compile%20the%20time%20lapse%20into%20a%20video%20for%20you.%20With%20standard%20time%20lapse%20and%20Night%20Lapse%2C%20you%20have%20to%20do%20this%20with%20and%20editor.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EJust%20a%20note%20about%20using%20an%20editor%3A%20If%20your%20time%2Fnight%20lapse%20spans%20over%20night%20into%20the%20next%20day%2C%20you%20need%20to%20make%20sure%20you%20have%20all%20of%20the%20pictures%20in%20the%20same%20file%20on%20your%20computer%20before%20compiling%20it.%20If%20you%20use%20GoPro%20Quik%20to%20import%20your%20media%2C%20it%20will%20make%20a%20folder%20for%20each%20day.%20In%20one%20folder%20will%20be%20the%20first%20day%20and%20the%20other%20folder%20will%20have%20the%20remaining%20photos.%20Just%20cut%20and%20paste%20the%20pictures%20from%20the%20second%20day%20into%20the%20first%20and%20you%20should%20be%20good%20to%20go.%3CBR%20%2F%3E%3CBR%20%2F%3EHope%20this%20helps.%3C%2FLINGO-BODY%3E
Reply
Highlighted
Tourist
Posts: 4
Accepted Solution

Timelapse question

Question on nightlapse.

Does the shutter automatically adjust during increasing or decreasing light when set to an interval of say 15 seconds, or does it stay open the entire 15 seconds? Here is a scenario: sunrise. Need long exposures while dark then slowly quickening as the scene brightens? Second part of the question: Nightlapse seems to be a series of still pics. Timewarp seems to be automatically creating a video from all the stills it takes. Do either automatically adjust exposure and is one more preferable than the other for the above scenario? BTW, I have a GP7. Using recommended cards, manually updated, and it actually seems to be working quite well indeed. So far so good. Fingers crossed!


Accepted Solutions
Explorer
Posts: 12,026

Re: Timelapse question

Good questions. First, to answer your question I need to explain the difference between Interval and Shutter speed.

Shutter speed is how long the camera allows for exposure to the sensor. So, if your Shutter speed is set to 15 seconds, every picture, no matter how much light is present, will expose for the full 15 seconds.

Interval is how long the camera will wait between taking pictures. So, if you have a set Shutter of 5 seconds, but an interval of 15 seconds, the pictures will expose for 5 seconds, but wait 15 seconds before taking the next picture.

In the scenario you present, slowly brightening scene, it's usually best to just have the shutter set to Auto. The Auto shutter in night lapse exposures ranges from 1/4096th sec to 30 sec. As the light increases, the shutter speed will get faster (shorter duration).

Sometimes the changing light can cause a flickering effect. You will probably see this most prominently during the transition phase between the dark and bright scene. For most people, it's not a big deal and usually it goes unnoticed until it's pointed out. Unfortunately, once you are aware of it, it's one of those things that you just can't "un-see". Professional photographers will most certainly see it.

There are editing programs that you can use to remove this flicker. One free program is called TLTools http://www.tltools.it/wp/en/ and it may be something you want to try. If you search for Time Lapse deflicker (app, program, or editor) you should be able to find other options as well.

Personally, I usually just leave my time lapse as is.

As far as TimeWarp is concerned, I think it uses the same shutter speeds of regular photos, somewhere between 1/8000th of a second and around 1/60th of a second. So for what you have described, I don't think you will get enough exposure during the dark scenes. The benefit of TimeWarp, of course, is it will compile the time lapse into a video for you. With standard time lapse and Night Lapse, you have to do this with and editor.

Just a note about using an editor: If your time/night lapse spans over night into the next day, you need to make sure you have all of the pictures in the same file on your computer before compiling it. If you use GoPro Quik to import your media, it will make a folder for each day. In one folder will be the first day and the other folder will have the remaining photos. Just cut and paste the pictures from the second day into the first and you should be good to go.

Hope this helps.

View solution in original post


All Replies
Explorer
Posts: 12,026

Re: Timelapse question

Good questions. First, to answer your question I need to explain the difference between Interval and Shutter speed.

Shutter speed is how long the camera allows for exposure to the sensor. So, if your Shutter speed is set to 15 seconds, every picture, no matter how much light is present, will expose for the full 15 seconds.

Interval is how long the camera will wait between taking pictures. So, if you have a set Shutter of 5 seconds, but an interval of 15 seconds, the pictures will expose for 5 seconds, but wait 15 seconds before taking the next picture.

In the scenario you present, slowly brightening scene, it's usually best to just have the shutter set to Auto. The Auto shutter in night lapse exposures ranges from 1/4096th sec to 30 sec. As the light increases, the shutter speed will get faster (shorter duration).

Sometimes the changing light can cause a flickering effect. You will probably see this most prominently during the transition phase between the dark and bright scene. For most people, it's not a big deal and usually it goes unnoticed until it's pointed out. Unfortunately, once you are aware of it, it's one of those things that you just can't "un-see". Professional photographers will most certainly see it.

There are editing programs that you can use to remove this flicker. One free program is called TLTools http://www.tltools.it/wp/en/ and it may be something you want to try. If you search for Time Lapse deflicker (app, program, or editor) you should be able to find other options as well.

Personally, I usually just leave my time lapse as is.

As far as TimeWarp is concerned, I think it uses the same shutter speeds of regular photos, somewhere between 1/8000th of a second and around 1/60th of a second. So for what you have described, I don't think you will get enough exposure during the dark scenes. The benefit of TimeWarp, of course, is it will compile the time lapse into a video for you. With standard time lapse and Night Lapse, you have to do this with and editor.

Just a note about using an editor: If your time/night lapse spans over night into the next day, you need to make sure you have all of the pictures in the same file on your computer before compiling it. If you use GoPro Quik to import your media, it will make a folder for each day. In one folder will be the first day and the other folder will have the remaining photos. Just cut and paste the pictures from the second day into the first and you should be good to go.

Hope this helps.