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Nomad
Posts: 301

The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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Hi guys

 

I would like to ask you about the best settings to film night - light - show by GP7HB. Most of the time I ll be filming some light projection mapping on the buildings walls. My personal experience tells me this, could you agree or should I fix something ?

 

4k or 2,7 - 24 or 30 fps to have more light...

Iso - hmmmm.... here is a problem maybe max 1600 , min like 400 ?

Colors : Flat

WB: Auto ?

FOV - Linear (2,7k only)

Shutter : Auto ?

Sharpness: Medium or High ?

EV = 0.

 

Thx for advices.

 

 


Accepted Solutions
Explorer
Posts: 13,028

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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Is the camera going to be mounted (tripod) or hand held?
I've found that when mounted, or with the Karma Grip 4K (4:3)/24fps works best in low light.
As far as your other settings:
Keep your ISO as low as possible (anything above 800 will have significant noise)
If motion (blur) isn't an issue, start with a shutter of 1/24 and then adjust the max ISO to the lowest setting with acceptable ISO. Leave your Max ISO at this value and then change the shutter back to Auto (to allow the camera to make adjustments to variable light). MIN is fine at 100, but bumping it up a little to prevent the accidental underexposure is fine. Just remember, correcting underexposed shots is much easier than correcting overexposed (which generally can't be recovered).
EV: (not really important. If you have motion/movement of the camera or subject, a NEGATIVE value of -0.5 or -1 can help to prevent the shutter from going too slow).
Sharpness: I usually use LOW and then adjust in post. Medium if you don't want to have to mess with it too much. LOW allows for more finesse with the contrast.
WB: I like to set this manually, but I've noticed on the HERO7 Black it usually looks fine on Auto. If you don't mind the extra work color grading in post, Native usually gives the cleanest image.
Color: Your preference.

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All Replies
Explorer
Posts: 13,028

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

[ New ]
Is the camera going to be mounted (tripod) or hand held?
I've found that when mounted, or with the Karma Grip 4K (4:3)/24fps works best in low light.
As far as your other settings:
Keep your ISO as low as possible (anything above 800 will have significant noise)
If motion (blur) isn't an issue, start with a shutter of 1/24 and then adjust the max ISO to the lowest setting with acceptable ISO. Leave your Max ISO at this value and then change the shutter back to Auto (to allow the camera to make adjustments to variable light). MIN is fine at 100, but bumping it up a little to prevent the accidental underexposure is fine. Just remember, correcting underexposed shots is much easier than correcting overexposed (which generally can't be recovered).
EV: (not really important. If you have motion/movement of the camera or subject, a NEGATIVE value of -0.5 or -1 can help to prevent the shutter from going too slow).
Sharpness: I usually use LOW and then adjust in post. Medium if you don't want to have to mess with it too much. LOW allows for more finesse with the contrast.
WB: I like to set this manually, but I've noticed on the HERO7 Black it usually looks fine on Auto. If you don't mind the extra work color grading in post, Native usually gives the cleanest image.
Color: Your preference.
Nomad
Posts: 301

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

[ New ]
Thx for answer. I am gonna put in on tripod. I ll test some settings before event but I ll follow your advices :). I am wonder how it will be looks like with 1/24 shutter, never use other value than auto.
Explorer
Posts: 13,028

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

[ New ]
1/24 will allow the most light to hit the sensor, but will also create the most motion blur. Use this shutter speed to determine the lowest ISO that you can use while still maintaining enough brightness. I would not leave it at this, though, as using Auto (after setting the MAX ISO) will allow the camera to make adjustments as necessary.
Adventurer
Posts: 13,652

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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Some on this site recommended this   (WINK)   so  ithought I post it for him

 

IMG_2099[1].JPG

Nomad
Posts: 301

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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Can you share a link, thx.
Adventurer
Posts: 13,652

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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there aere two people in here who are  you referring to and share a linf for what?  the photo posted?

Explorer
Posts: 13,028

Re: The best settings for lightshow - GP7HB

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@enc3ladus 

Here is a video that I did awhile back using the settings I described.  Granted, the color grading in the edit isn't great (especially in the beginning) but since this was a family video, it was more important for me to increase gain to see my kid's  faces then it was to reduce noise in the image.  This was a very challenging environment for any camera as the night sky was very dark with many different light sources coming from different directions.

 

 

As far as the settings in the photo FISH shared, those are fine if the camera is going to be moving around a lot.  Especially if you are using Hypersmoothh (1/240 shutter or faster is actually ideal).  I'm not sure, but I think this might have been from a post I wrote.  If it's the one I'm thinking of, my focus was on getting the best low light results with Hypersmoothh stabilization (hence my initial questions about whether or not the camera would be mounted (tripod) or not.  Since you are going to have the camera on a tripod, i wouldn't use the settings in the picture.  There really doesn't seem to be any benefit to shooting in 60fps for your project, so I would avoid this as it will just make your image darker.  30 fps is fine, but why not give your camera the most time to expose by using 24fps?  Every little bit helps.  ISO is the most important factor.  You want this as low as possible for your video (this is not always true for photo, but with video on a fixed aperture lens, always shoot for as low as you can).