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Tourist
Posts: 7
Accepted Solution

Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

Hi there,

can someone tell me how the stabilization in the GoPro Hero 6 does excatly work? I have read different things hereto from some telling that the camera does a sligt digital zoom-in (in order to get the stabilization effect) to some telling that it does a crop of 10% (without digitally zooming in). What is actually correct?

 

Thanks

Christian


Accepted Solutions
Explorer
Posts: 12,391

Re: Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

I think that it's also important to note that with EIS, there needs to be well lit subjects and defined horizon for it to work best.

Here is how I understand it.
The Gyro data in the camera tells the processor how much the camera is moving. The visual cues the camera extrapolates from the video image tells it how much the subject/horizon is moving. The processor then has to calculate the correction by looking at the difference in these values and applying the appropriate amount of stabilization. It's very complicated as the camera has to accurately determine intentional movement from unwanted shake/vibration.

Because of the above, if you want good stabilization you need to carry and move the camera in the same way a stabilizer does. If you watch a camera in a stabilizer (actually watching the device, not the video created ), turns and up/down movements are delayed, slow, and sweeping. If you move your Hero6 in this same manner, you can get near gimbal like stabilization. However, if you are jerking the camera up and down or turning quickly, you will get jumps in the video. GoPro released an update that helps with this and makes it look more "natural" but then some people freaked out stating the stabilization wasn't as good, when in fact it is much better.

At night or during low light, the camera isn't able to distinguish visual cues for the stabilization so EIS is turn off in the latest update. Prior firmware versions kept EIS on in low light and this created jumpy erratic videos.

When it comes to crop, the camera sensor always has room to play with unless you are using 4:3 or Superview. The camera uses this extra space to be able to stabilize the video (as demonstrated above by @robert1326 ). To have enough space around the boarder, the camera creates an additional 10% Crop. For the best stabilization, manually zooming a tiny bit will also help.

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Backpacker
Posts: 733

Re: Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

[ Edited ]

hi Christian,

 

the zoom-in is actually a crop.

Camera read all information across the frame, but you will see only the red area.

 

below is an old post of mine.

 

 

hi all,

 

 

 

.....

 

 

my view of EIS stabilization is:

a crop is made from the entire surface of the sensor, in the centre.

as long as the movement of the camera can be compensated by the movement of the cropped area inside the entire area, stabilization works.

when the movement is too steep, with a larger amplitude, if the cropped has to "move" more than the entire area, it is not possible to compensate the movement, so the image "jumps".

 

if we want less "jumps", we have to accept more crop, to give the camera the chance to compensate.

 

Untitled.jpg

EIS works fantastic till the cropped area, between frames, remain in the entire area. 

this leads to another known behaviour:

- in low light, when the shutter speed is 1/25 1/30 ...meaning 1/fps, the chance the crop area to exceed the entire area is way greater...because has more time to do it....and the stabilized image looks jelly.

 

I keep saying, in life and in technology everything has a price...

 

just me,

 

robert

 

 

 

Explorer
Posts: 12,391

Re: Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

I think that it's also important to note that with EIS, there needs to be well lit subjects and defined horizon for it to work best.

Here is how I understand it.
The Gyro data in the camera tells the processor how much the camera is moving. The visual cues the camera extrapolates from the video image tells it how much the subject/horizon is moving. The processor then has to calculate the correction by looking at the difference in these values and applying the appropriate amount of stabilization. It's very complicated as the camera has to accurately determine intentional movement from unwanted shake/vibration.

Because of the above, if you want good stabilization you need to carry and move the camera in the same way a stabilizer does. If you watch a camera in a stabilizer (actually watching the device, not the video created ), turns and up/down movements are delayed, slow, and sweeping. If you move your Hero6 in this same manner, you can get near gimbal like stabilization. However, if you are jerking the camera up and down or turning quickly, you will get jumps in the video. GoPro released an update that helps with this and makes it look more "natural" but then some people freaked out stating the stabilization wasn't as good, when in fact it is much better.

At night or during low light, the camera isn't able to distinguish visual cues for the stabilization so EIS is turn off in the latest update. Prior firmware versions kept EIS on in low light and this created jumpy erratic videos.

When it comes to crop, the camera sensor always has room to play with unless you are using 4:3 or Superview. The camera uses this extra space to be able to stabilize the video (as demonstrated above by @robert1326 ). To have enough space around the boarder, the camera creates an additional 10% Crop. For the best stabilization, manually zooming a tiny bit will also help.
Tourist
Posts: 7

Re: Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

Thank you!

As I wanted to use EIS during my snorkelling trip in Norway in December (when there is not much light available) and wanted to have good picture quality, it sounds from your responses that I better do not turn the EIS on.

 

Best,

Christian

Highlighted
Explorer
Posts: 12,391

Re: Stabilization in Hero 6 - how does it exactly work?

Water tends to do a pretty good job stabilizing the camera on it's own, although this video by Mic Bergsma shows the benefit of EIS turned on.  You do need decent lighting though. In my opinion, the shots with stabilization generally look pretty good.