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Tourist
Posts: 2

Hypersmooth setting for lowight

Hello question for people who know camera software. I do mountain biking and it requires a good amount of stability and there is alot of different lighting conditions. Bright to darker transitions going in and out of tree cover. I have my hero 8 updated to the latest update shooting in 4k 30fps hypersmooth on high iso min 100 max 400 and evo comp at -0.5 and chesty mount a good one not the junk go pro ones. The footage looks great in the open then looked like there was no stabilization at all in the woods this was a overcast day . The footage was shacky and unusable in the woods. I have yet to try the lowlight setting because I want to see if there a setting I can set for all conditions. Any advice all I can find is turn lowlight on and it help.

I did fool around and did 4k30 shutter at 120fps and iso at 100 min 3200 max super stable but way to jumpy in trainsistions from dark to light any advice will be appreciated!
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Explorer
Posts: 12,856

Re: Hypersmooth setting for lowight

First, I don't know what you mean by, "not the junk go pro ones" as the new Chest Harness is very good quality and with the additional padding on the back, it sits firmly against your chest.

That aside, for EIS stabilization to work best you need a fast shutter. A shutter of 1/240 or faster is best. 1/120 works, but isn't as good. Anything below that and the stabilization falls apart with the increased motion blur. The camera will automatically turn down the amount of stabilization applied the slower the shutter goes.

This comment, "I did fool around and did 4k30 shutter at 120fps" doesn't really make sense as you are confusing frame rate and shutter speed, but I think it was just a typo. I believe you meant, 4K/30fps at 1/120 shutter.

To keep a fast shutter in low light and maintain a decent amount of brightness, the camera has to increase the charge (excitability) of the sensor pixels. This of course increases noise/grain the more "excited" the pixels get. Pretty much anything over ISO MAX of 800 is going to introduce noticeable noise. This is just how cameras work. Without an adjustable aperture, you are limited to these two settings. Your decision therefore, has to be deciding if you want darker and cleaner images in low light, or if a brighter image with more noise/grain is acceptable.

Auto low light does absolutely nothing when using 30fps. The function of Auto Low light is to reduce the frame rate when the camera moves into low light. At 60 frames per second, the absolute slowest the shutter can expose for is 1/60th of a second (one complete frame). At 30 frames per second, the shutter can stay open for twice as long and allow more light to hit the sensor. This is fine for static shots or where there isn't much movement. However, the longer the shutter stays open for that one frame, the more motion blur you will get. Using 30fps may not be the best setting for your scenario as the last thing you will want is a super slow shutter. This is one of the reasons people trying for the ridiculous "cinematic" effect in their action camera get disappointed when they see artifact and bad image clarity when biking through high contrast areas.

What you EV does is help to control the Auto setting of the camera's ISO and Shutter. When you lower the EV you are telling the camera to favor a LOWER ISO and FASTER shutter. Turning up the EV has the opposite effect. You are lowering the EV, so in effect you are telling the camera that when in low light, YOU WANT a darker image. It sounds like it's giving you what you are asking for.

Now, lowering EV is not always bad in low light. The benefit of course is that it directs the camera to use a faster shutter. However, if you ALSO have an ISO MIN of 100, you are again ASKING for a darker image. To use a negative EV for better EIS, you need to INCREASE the MIN ISO. The MAX ISO can be left 800 (400 if you absolutely don't want any noise grain or 1600 if you want the best exposure) but your MIN ISO should be 400. Of course, this could potentially cause issues in brighter areas, but the shutter should be able to compensate by decreasing the exposure time. Using 60fps will assist in this as well.

Another thing to consider is forgetting about EV all together and spot metering. One issue you can run into with a wide angle lens is that it has to take into consideration the ENTIRE FOV when deciding upon the correct exposure settings. This means that even if the trail itself is dark, if you have bright light coming through the top of the trees and it's being identified by the top left of the image, the camera is going to consider that when choosing the exposure. This in turn will darken the remaining image. Instead of using EV, press and hold on the rear LCD to bring up the Exposure control. A box will appear that becomes the only area the camera considers when choosing the exposure values. You can lock this to what you want or allow the camera to adjust as the lighting changes only for that boxed area. This is also refereed to as Spot Metering and can significantly improve your image when used correctly.
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Adventurer
Posts: 11,706

Re: Hypersmooth setting for lowight

Spot metering may be hard as you must set a point first, and your're moving. I wonder if GoPro has a  center Point.

 

 GoPro did recommend ISO 100 min  ISO 400 Max  on any shot  . you als may want to try camera Angle as well,  point more down  and  may be a change of FOV.  

 

Fish

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Tourist
Posts: 2

Re: Hypersmooth setting for lowight

Thanks a ton and yes It was a typo I did 4k 30fps and 1/120 . I played around and found that the best thing to do is increase the shutter to 1/240 and try and adjust the iso and evo to make the images stable and not to dark. I have yet to ride my bike with this setting but I mounted my gopro to my chin on my helmet and with the new info I think I'll be able to get semi stable footage and not need to use my gimble and gopro hero 4 any longer.
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Explorer
Posts: 12,856

Re: Hypersmooth setting for lowight

@darrellc24 

Sounds like your settings should work.  Let us know how it goes.

 

@fishycomics Yes, the GoPro does have "center point" spot metering.  The Selective light metering can be done by locking the exposure setting so that it doesn't change, or, by default, the camera will make adjustments as the light changes, but only by taking in consideration the area withing the box.  Pressing the center of the LCD creates the traditional spot metering of center frame light metering only.