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Hiker
Posts: 185

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

Welcome to the world of video editing. :-) 

Yes, it a mess with codecs, fps, resolutions, proxies, compression, laggingetc etc etc.
Better cameras need better computers in a vicious circle...

its a trap! 

Explorer
Posts: 12,793

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

@noelb82276
As far as your computer specs, it's pretty under powered.

The integrated Intel HD Graphics 4000 that comes with the ACER ASPIRE R7 isn't ideal for 4K video editing (HEVC or h.264). The other issue you will have is if the processor is a Intel Core i5-3337U. This processor is 2 core and based on Ivry bridge tech which is 2013 technology. You really need a Intel Haswell based CPU and quad core for 4k editing. As far as RAM is concerned, DDR3 came out in 2007. 8GB DDR4 is really the minimum. Minimum equals functional but at the lowest playback resolutions and limited in function. For 4K video editing, 16GB is really a decent minimum and even then you will usually have to lower playback resolution.

In general, laptops are not the best video editors. They can be, but usually you need to spend for a higher end machine. Gaming laptops tend to work well and can be more budget friendly of you get a lower end machine.

In my opinion, the minimum specs for a video editing machine are:
Intel Core i7 2.3GHz four-core
16GB DDR3 or 8GB DDR4 (With a good GPU)
NVIDIA GTX 1060 (you can get a cheaper, lower spec GPU like the GeForce GT 750M or GTX660 but will be limited and regretting it in a year or two)
SSD storage is best but costly. Hard disk are fine but preferably one with 7,200rpm.
Explorer
Posts: 12,793

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

@no66

It's more than a trap, it's a sickness.  I have a Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming i7-7700HQ Quad Core, 32GB DDR4, NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1050Ti, 128GB Solid State Drive (Boot) + 1TB 5400RPM Hard Drive and looking to upgrade.  You just never can get enough processing power.

Tourist
Posts: 18

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

This reply is exactly what I would have expected from gopro. Daniel doe you work for gopro?

Tourist
Posts: 18

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

Haha, thanks Im starting to see that
Tourist
Posts: 18

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

Daniel AWESOME I have waited almost 2 months for the help you just gave me. This is great I now know exactly what I need to do. I wanted to go desktop option but I tend to travel a bit and dont want to buy many SD cards I'd rather upload to pc when Im done with something. Can you recommend a laptop in a range around R20,000 I'd like not to regret it in two years preferably spend a little more to work efficiently. Time is precious. Thanks again appreciate your input!
Explorer
Posts: 12,793

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

I'm partial to Dell computers and I'm not sure what the prices are in your area (it just says "Contact Dell) but you might want to consider the Alienware 17 http://www.dell.com/za/p/alienware-17-r3/pd?ref=PD_OC, or the Inspiron 15 7000 gaming http://www.dell.com/za/p/inspiron-15-7577-laptop/pd?ref=PD_Family

The Alienware laptop is going to be more powerful but also heavier and louder. I have last years Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming with a GTX1050ti. It works very well but I'd rather have the GTX1060 because it's a significant upgrade. The GTX1080 is vastly superior and more future proof but the cost makes it outside of mine, and your, budget.

I'm a bit of a label loyalist until a brand does me wrong. I used to purchase HP computers until I started having consistent issues. Now I steer clear of them. HP seems to be more focused on enterprise workhorse machines and haven't really impressed me with there personal computers/laptops. That doesn't mean they are bad, just not something I can recommend due to past experiences.

Basically though, it's not so much the name of the computer as it is the components inside. Start with your budget and try to get as close as you can to the specs I mentioned in my earlier post. If you can get the best components at an affordable price in any brand, go for it.

Start with the processor and GPU and then the most RAM you can afford. Get the best processor you can. i3, i5, and i7 all start off as i7 chips but once they come off the assembly line and are tested it is determined which is which.

The i5 are i7 that don't meet the minimum spec requirements of an i7. Some i5 chips might be close to the same performance as the i7 but some might perform closer to the i3. If you get an i7 you know you are getting a good chip. i3 are junk and should not be considered. You want as many cores as you can afford and the latest chips have the most current instruction sets. AMD having been trying to up their game but it's safer to just stick with Intel. Get at least a Quad Core. If you can get an Octa Core (very unlikely) get it, even if it means compromising in other areas. To future proof your laptop for as long as possible, always get the latest generation.

A 4K monitor is nice but not necessary. You will do fine with an IPS display but DO NOT get a TFT.

A 256SSD will serve you better than a 1T 5200 rpm hard drive because it will move data faster and you can always just use an external hard drive to store you videos/photos. A 128SSD with internal 1T 5200rpm hard drive isn't a bad option, but it requires a lot of file management for maximum workflow efficiency when editing. The best middle ground is just getting a 7200rpm hard drive if possible.

This is all just my opinion, but I hope it helps.

Best of luck,
Daniel
Explorer
Posts: 12,793

Re: How to work with 1080p 240fps

Oh, and no, I don't work for GoPro.

GoPro has been a part of my family and my life for a little over 6 years. Because of GoPro cameras I have been able to capture and create photos and videos of our lives that I wouldn't have been able to do with any other camera. When my child was born, GoPro was there. Birthdays, holidays, weddings, and funerals. GoPro was there to capture those moments. Everything from my kids first step, riding a bike, skating a half pipe and his first time riding a wave, I have all of those moments saved because of GoPro.

I've also captured my own person moments like the first time I successfully dropped in on a 20'+ wave. Luckily I've also been able to make some money with GoPro as it's a great camera for capturing unique and previously unobtainable angles and POV for events.

The competition has increased and now there are many decent alternatives, but I still feel GoPro is the best at meeting (and exceeding) my needs.

I participate on this site not for any other reason than my wish that others can have the same, if not better, experience that I have been able to achieve. I can sometimes be a little overly defensive, but only because I don't want others to be unduly discouraged without knowing all of the facts.

My advice, film everything. You never really know when you might capture a gem worth holding onto for a lifetime. Over time you learn what works best for you and what doesn't. For the longest time I was always trying to max out the resolution in everything I filmed. These days I've learned that unless it's extremely important (like filming an event for someone) 1080/60 generally works best. At this resolution/frame rate I can quickly and easily make fun QuikStories to share with friends and family and still have decent quality for more intense PC editing. Since most people are watching the videos on mobile devices, having all the extra resolution of 4K rarely pays off for just fun family moments.