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Tourist
Posts: 4

Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

Is there a fix for yaw stabilization during high-g force scenarios?  It's so bad I thought my mount was loose.  Camera is pointed at windshield from within vehicle (mounted to passenger headrest) and will "look right or left" depending on the G-force in corners.  It makes the footage completely unusable as the camera will "look" through a side window until it's back on a straightaway.  Using Narrow/1080/60, or linear/1080/60 with 1.4X zoom.

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Nomad
Posts: 3,196

Re: Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

There's no way to lock the yaw settings, however there is a very simple way to reduce the amount of yaw and that is to adjust your hypersmooth settings.  Just about everyone seems to think "Boost" or "High" is the best setting to use.  Sure, if you're in a handheld situation it may be, but for cars or planes, low is the way to go.

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Tourist
Posts: 4

Re: Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

Thank you, helpful response.  I came to a similar conclusion, but it only 'reduces' the issue, doesn't solve it.  Right now I'm playing around with 3rd party apps to stablilize post-production...which costs money and time.  I just cant believe that there aren't more folks screaming about this issue: aviation, automotive, etc.  Anytime a fixed reference point is preferred in a high-g scenario.

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Nomad
Posts: 3,196

Re: Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

I think it depends on who the biggest consumer is and what they see is the issue.  There's been one or two posts from drivers mostly who don't like that yawing action that you're seeing.  Not a huge fan of it myself.  However overall, the EIS they have in place suits most customers.  For those who don't like it they can always edit it out in 3rd party software just by locking points of the frame.

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Tourist
Posts: 4

Re: Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

@irishmanpdxThanks for the help, and very kind of you to engage.  Got some user friendly software suggestions where I could lock the frame like you're suggesting?  Sounds like what I'm looking for.  Right now my (excessively long) workflow solution is:

 

- Record from within vehicle without any stabilization, GPS off (because it won't acquire and therfore won't collect gyro data)

- Stabilize w/ ReelSteady

- Import into RaceRender and combine with over footage.

- Render and export.

 

Overall, the process is pretty cumbersome, especially when I'm shooting ~5 20-min footage sessions.  If I could record in hypersmooth and simply frame lock it would simplify greatly.

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Nomad
Posts: 3,196

Re: Hero8 Yaw Stabilization wanders in vehicle

The only thing GPS does is provide your camera with GPS data as regards time and location data, it doesn't have anything to do with stabilization, that comes from two different sources, the internal gyroscope and image frame analysis.  

 

ReelSteady just uses the same gyro information recorded by your camera to apply it's own version of stabilization.  So your best bet would be to leave GPS turned ON (if you want to use any GPS specific gauges like speed, map location etc) and turn your hypersmooth down low or off.  Also then shoot in a narrow FOV (although this will crop the image slightly thus reducing quality).

 

Locking the frame could be done in a number of video editors, however it require's a bit of know how and I'm not sure which video editors support it natively or have it as part of an add on (like Adobe Effects for instance).  You could try looking at DaVinci Pro and seeing if it's something that it could do (since it's a professional editor and it's free for personal use).  

 

When you lock parts of the frame in place, note that you are still going to have to crop the image somewhat, but you'll be keeping the inside of the car steady in the frame as opposed to keeping the horizon steady (which is what the GoPro tries to do).