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Tourist
Posts: 5

Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

Is there a reason the SanDisk Extreme 128 GB is not listed as a compatible micro SD card? My Hero 5 can use the 128 GB but not the newest camera? The Hero 7 has listed the SanDisk Extreme 32 GB & 64 GB as compatible, but not the same exact card that is 128 GB. Hopefully someone can clarify or explain.

 

Thanks


Accepted Solutions
Explorer
Posts: 13,045

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

Just for some clarification. Although "recommended" is used to describe the list of cards for consideration, these are just cards that have been tested and known to work.

The "recommendation" is just, "purchasing name brand microSD cards through official resellers".

That being said, the size of storage does matter as well as how the storage cells on the card are being utilized. When designing SD storage, manufacturers will use SLC, MLC, and TLC storage techniques. Single Level Cells (SLC) are the most reliable, fastest, and have the best longevity. Multi-Level Cells (MLC) are most common on your "Pro" cards and work very well. To increase storage capacity at a cheap cost, manufacturers will use Triple-Level Cell (TLC) storage. TLC is not as fast, less reliable (more prone to errors) and has a shorter longevity than the methods above.

Although it is common for manufacturers to list "UP TO" read speeds (which means absolutely nothing when it comes to filming) and some even list, "UP TO" write speeds, they rarely, if ever, give the type of storage method being used. Even with these "UP TO" ratings, it's also important to remember that these numbers represent optimal settings in a laboratory. Increased storage, generally means a reduction in performance, reliability, and longevity.

When it comes to SanDisk, unfortunately that company seems to produce cards that are really hit and miss. Back in the HERO3/3+ days, GoPro had to release a patch to reduce the camera recording bit rate because SanDisk had released cards that couldn't keep up (although SanDisk advertised they could).

Later, when the HERO5 and into the HERO6 release, SanDisk released a batch of Extreme cards that had poor performance and were quietly replacing these cards for anyone who called them to complain (the issue send to have been resolved with the v30 cards).

Michael Marks served on the Board of Directors for both SanDisk and GoPro for a very long time, and as such, I believe is one of the reasons GoPro has had such a strong promotional relationship with SanDisk. While GoPro can't take all the credit, they were very influential in the popularity and growth of SanDisk (much like with Ambarella).

SD cards do matter. They also can have manufacturer defects, not perform up to specs, and encounter issues over time (especially if you frequently remove/replace them into devices or don't periodically format them). The "recommended" list just helps in trouble shooting if an issue is coming from the card or the camera.

In general, when a person is having issues with their camera (freezing, overheating, battery drain, file repair, corrupt files, or SD error), then the steps to trouble shooting are:
1) use a tested card from the "recommended" list
2) perform a FULL format of the card
3) download and install the Manual update
4) Factory Reset the camera
5) Format the card in the camera
If the person is still having camera issues, perform the above steps with a different SD card (preferably from the same list).

If people start off by using a "recommended" SD card, this assist in trouble shooting, reduces the need to spend more money on a card that may or may not correct the issue, and generally prevents people from having issues in the first place.

If your preferred card is not on the list, you can still try it. The list is not an end all be all list. However, if you do have issues, Support will request that you try a card from the list before issuing an exchange. For this reason, it's best to just stick to the list.

In my experience, 64GB is more than enough (except in prolonged continuous shoots with external power), and far outlast the camera battery. Any storage capacity larger than 64GB, generally, is a waste, increases risk of damaged (corrupt) files, reduces performance, and discourages people from offloading their media in a timely manner. Since it's best to always format the card in the camera before every shoot, large capacity cards tend to discourage this practice as people keep their videos/photos on the card too long.

While there are times when using a 128GB it even 256GB card is more convenient (vacations being one of them), it also increases the likelihood of losing all of your captured moments if something happens to the card. Additionally, as I mentioned earlier, higher capacity cards generally don't work as well as the same make/model lower capacity cards.

View solution in original post


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GoPro
Posts: 6,097

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

 

Hi @noblemesa52181,

 

There is no specific reason but based on personal experience that card is glitchy and causes some problem. 

 

That's why they recommend those Sandisk with lower data storage.

 

You can use Lexar or Samsung or the SanDisk Video Class. 

 

Regards,

-Jay

Explorer
Posts: 13,045

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

Just for some clarification. Although "recommended" is used to describe the list of cards for consideration, these are just cards that have been tested and known to work.

The "recommendation" is just, "purchasing name brand microSD cards through official resellers".

That being said, the size of storage does matter as well as how the storage cells on the card are being utilized. When designing SD storage, manufacturers will use SLC, MLC, and TLC storage techniques. Single Level Cells (SLC) are the most reliable, fastest, and have the best longevity. Multi-Level Cells (MLC) are most common on your "Pro" cards and work very well. To increase storage capacity at a cheap cost, manufacturers will use Triple-Level Cell (TLC) storage. TLC is not as fast, less reliable (more prone to errors) and has a shorter longevity than the methods above.

Although it is common for manufacturers to list "UP TO" read speeds (which means absolutely nothing when it comes to filming) and some even list, "UP TO" write speeds, they rarely, if ever, give the type of storage method being used. Even with these "UP TO" ratings, it's also important to remember that these numbers represent optimal settings in a laboratory. Increased storage, generally means a reduction in performance, reliability, and longevity.

When it comes to SanDisk, unfortunately that company seems to produce cards that are really hit and miss. Back in the HERO3/3+ days, GoPro had to release a patch to reduce the camera recording bit rate because SanDisk had released cards that couldn't keep up (although SanDisk advertised they could).

Later, when the HERO5 and into the HERO6 release, SanDisk released a batch of Extreme cards that had poor performance and were quietly replacing these cards for anyone who called them to complain (the issue send to have been resolved with the v30 cards).

Michael Marks served on the Board of Directors for both SanDisk and GoPro for a very long time, and as such, I believe is one of the reasons GoPro has had such a strong promotional relationship with SanDisk. While GoPro can't take all the credit, they were very influential in the popularity and growth of SanDisk (much like with Ambarella).

SD cards do matter. They also can have manufacturer defects, not perform up to specs, and encounter issues over time (especially if you frequently remove/replace them into devices or don't periodically format them). The "recommended" list just helps in trouble shooting if an issue is coming from the card or the camera.

In general, when a person is having issues with their camera (freezing, overheating, battery drain, file repair, corrupt files, or SD error), then the steps to trouble shooting are:
1) use a tested card from the "recommended" list
2) perform a FULL format of the card
3) download and install the Manual update
4) Factory Reset the camera
5) Format the card in the camera
If the person is still having camera issues, perform the above steps with a different SD card (preferably from the same list).

If people start off by using a "recommended" SD card, this assist in trouble shooting, reduces the need to spend more money on a card that may or may not correct the issue, and generally prevents people from having issues in the first place.

If your preferred card is not on the list, you can still try it. The list is not an end all be all list. However, if you do have issues, Support will request that you try a card from the list before issuing an exchange. For this reason, it's best to just stick to the list.

In my experience, 64GB is more than enough (except in prolonged continuous shoots with external power), and far outlast the camera battery. Any storage capacity larger than 64GB, generally, is a waste, increases risk of damaged (corrupt) files, reduces performance, and discourages people from offloading their media in a timely manner. Since it's best to always format the card in the camera before every shoot, large capacity cards tend to discourage this practice as people keep their videos/photos on the card too long.

While there are times when using a 128GB it even 256GB card is more convenient (vacations being one of them), it also increases the likelihood of losing all of your captured moments if something happens to the card. Additionally, as I mentioned earlier, higher capacity cards generally don't work as well as the same make/model lower capacity cards.

Explorer
Posts: 13,045

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]
Also, one other note. The HERO7 Black uses an overclocked GP1 processor with twice the RAM of the HERO6. The HERO5 uses an Ambarella precessor that has less processing power than the HERO6. Since the HERO7 Black increases the processing of the HERO6, there is a pretty big gap in performance between the HERO5 and HERO7 Black. It's certainly not an apples to apples comparison between HERO5 and HERO7 Black (a closer comparison would be HERO7 Silver and HERO5 Black).
Tourist
Posts: 5

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

Thank you very much for the explanation. I really appreciate it. I will use my 64 GB Sandisk in my Hero 7 Black and use my 128 GB in my Hero 5 Black. I have never had any issues with the 128 GB in my Hero 5. So I will stick with it and use my other two 64 GB cards in my Hero 7. Thanks again!

GoPro
Posts: 6,097

Re: Hero 7 SanDisk Extreme 128 GB

[ New ]

 

Glad to know that @noblemesa52181,

 

Feel free to let us know if you need more help.

 

-Jay