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Tourist
Posts: 4
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Help with Protune shutter speed! Whitewash and also black lines on display

Hey guys, I recently purchased a karma with the hero 6 black. I have researched the hell out of what settings offer the best cinematic footage quality. All of the videos almost unanimously state that the shutter speed should be double the FPS. However, whenever I set the shutter speed manually in protune I get a completely white washed video. I have shot in different lights and still tend to get this same effect. In lower lights or overcast it seems to go away mostly though. I have tried shooting in 24, 30, and 60 FPS with the corresponding shutter speeds of 48, 60, and 120. Everytime I do this I get black lines on the display which disappear upon import. NONE of this happens when I enable AUTO shutter on protune, I am shooting with 100-200 max ISO as well. I can't figure out what I am doing wrong, as all of the drone videos state to set the shutter double of the frame rate, but it seems to just ruin the video when I do that! HELP. 

 

I've attached some photos of what it looks like as well.

Sailboat photo.jpg

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Explorer
Posts: 12,950

Re: Help with Protune shutter speed! Whitewash and also black lines on display

If you are going to be manually setting the shutter speed you will need ND filters when used in daylight.  However, the real question is whether or not you really need to be setting the shutter manually. 

 

While the doubling of the shutter in relation to fps is a general rule for, "cinematic" footage, it's widely blown out of proportion as a filming technique.  Especially among drone enthusiast.  A little motion blur is important to show speed and movement.  For example, if you film a fight scene and don't have motion blur it looks more robotic and fake.  Having the motion blur makes the action seem fast, fluid, and more "real".  Another time you might need more motion blur is when filming something like a car driving.  The faster the car is moving the more we anticipate there to be motion blur.  If the shutter is too fast, the reduction in blur tends to reduce the sensation of movement.

 

There is no shortage of amateur photographers and vidoegraphers giving "professional" advice.  They take general principles and expound them as hard fast rules.  Rule of thirds, 30 degree rule, 180 degree rule, shutter double denominator of frame rate rule, ... There are plenty of "rules" but what really matters is how it looks to YOU. Photography/videography is an art form, and as such it's up to you to create how you want. Here is a little secret, the notion of, "best cinematic footage quality" is complete BS. True professionals use so many techniques, many of which break all the "rules", that to say that there is a setting for, "best cinematic footage quality" is complete hogwash.

 

It's understandable to want to get the "best" shot and thereby use the "best" settings.  But here is the thing, there are no "best" settings.  If there was, why would there be settings in the first place?  If there is one hard fast rule to getting the best shot, that rule would be applied and the setting fixed. 

 

Although you've heard that you should use a double frame rate for the shutter denominator, have you asked why you want this and if it's really the effect you want?  If you are doing a slow panoramic scan, this setting is going to look terrible.  However, if you are doing a reveal with a fast low level shot that ends with the drone high and stable looking out to the horizon, this setting can make it more dramatic and look very good. If you are filming something like a waterfall you may actually want a slower shutter to give the water a softer, more fluid look.  Perhaps you want to film a bird in flight and plan to slow the footage down for a dramatic slow motion of the wings stroking the air.  In this case, you want a much faster shutter so each frame is going to be clean and clear.

 

Set your ISO to 100 and leave the shutter on Auto.  Film.  Look at your footage and ask yourself, does this look good?  Do the settings need to be changed and if so, to accomplish what effect?  What video editor do you have?  What effects can be added in post vs in the camera?  If you are looking for a specific effect and aren't accomplishing it with the default settings, this is when you need to start changing things.  If you don't know the right settings feel free to post specifically what you're looking for and we'll try to figure it out for you.

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Highlighted
Explorer
Posts: 12,950

Re: Help with Protune shutter speed! Whitewash and also black lines on display

If you are going to be manually setting the shutter speed you will need ND filters when used in daylight.  However, the real question is whether or not you really need to be setting the shutter manually. 

 

While the doubling of the shutter in relation to fps is a general rule for, "cinematic" footage, it's widely blown out of proportion as a filming technique.  Especially among drone enthusiast.  A little motion blur is important to show speed and movement.  For example, if you film a fight scene and don't have motion blur it looks more robotic and fake.  Having the motion blur makes the action seem fast, fluid, and more "real".  Another time you might need more motion blur is when filming something like a car driving.  The faster the car is moving the more we anticipate there to be motion blur.  If the shutter is too fast, the reduction in blur tends to reduce the sensation of movement.

 

There is no shortage of amateur photographers and vidoegraphers giving "professional" advice.  They take general principles and expound them as hard fast rules.  Rule of thirds, 30 degree rule, 180 degree rule, shutter double denominator of frame rate rule, ... There are plenty of "rules" but what really matters is how it looks to YOU. Photography/videography is an art form, and as such it's up to you to create how you want. Here is a little secret, the notion of, "best cinematic footage quality" is complete BS. True professionals use so many techniques, many of which break all the "rules", that to say that there is a setting for, "best cinematic footage quality" is complete hogwash.

 

It's understandable to want to get the "best" shot and thereby use the "best" settings.  But here is the thing, there are no "best" settings.  If there was, why would there be settings in the first place?  If there is one hard fast rule to getting the best shot, that rule would be applied and the setting fixed. 

 

Although you've heard that you should use a double frame rate for the shutter denominator, have you asked why you want this and if it's really the effect you want?  If you are doing a slow panoramic scan, this setting is going to look terrible.  However, if you are doing a reveal with a fast low level shot that ends with the drone high and stable looking out to the horizon, this setting can make it more dramatic and look very good. If you are filming something like a waterfall you may actually want a slower shutter to give the water a softer, more fluid look.  Perhaps you want to film a bird in flight and plan to slow the footage down for a dramatic slow motion of the wings stroking the air.  In this case, you want a much faster shutter so each frame is going to be clean and clear.

 

Set your ISO to 100 and leave the shutter on Auto.  Film.  Look at your footage and ask yourself, does this look good?  Do the settings need to be changed and if so, to accomplish what effect?  What video editor do you have?  What effects can be added in post vs in the camera?  If you are looking for a specific effect and aren't accomplishing it with the default settings, this is when you need to start changing things.  If you don't know the right settings feel free to post specifically what you're looking for and we'll try to figure it out for you.

Highlighted
Explorer
Posts: 12,950

Re: Help with Protune shutter speed! Whitewash and also black lines on display

Regarding "best" settings, I saw in your other post that you are using iMove. You can do a little color grading with this app so you might want to try playing with your other settings.

Try this and see how it looks:
2.7K/60 Linear, Protune ON, Shutter Auto, ISO Max 100, WB (set this yourself, do not use Native), ev -1, Sharpness Medium (Low if there is a control in iMovie to increase sharpness), Color Flat (it's going to look a little washed out but you can bring up the saturation in iMovie).

Now, the question is why these settings.
Rational:
2.7K - (High resolution, allows zoom/crop in a 1080p sequence without losing detail, smaller and easier to use than 4K HEVC)
60fps - prevents shutter from dropping to low and creating excessive motion blur, allows for slow motion shots, gives better detail frame by frame
ISO max 100 - gives best image quality with least amount of grain/noise
WB manually set - makes it easier to color correct with editor
ev -1 - Reduces highlights in camera for more detail (can be increased with editor)
Sharpness Medium (Low) - prevents jagged edges and over sharpening in the camera
Color Flat - Increased detail and brightness in shadows (can be corrected in editor)
Highlighted
Tourist
Posts: 4

Re: Help with Protune shutter speed! Whitewash and also black lines on display

Thanks for the responses guys. You’re a life saver. This looks great! Thanks again!