Ask a Question
GoPro Support Hub Ask a question. Share an answer. Find a solution. Stay stoked.
Announcements
Is your GoPro gear up to date? Check to see If it is on our Update page.
Cameras
Reply
Tourist
Posts: 5

Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

What happened to hypersmooth in the 11th second of my movie? It looks like hitting the ground ruined the hypersmooth. I record video in 2.7K for the first time. It never happened when using 1080p60. Firmware 1.51

 

https://youtu.be/Csf8BCk73ek

GoPro
Posts: 6,097

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

 

Hi @greenhero36067,

 

May I know the SD card you're using? 

 

Looks like it was triggered due to sudden change of the vibration. 

But if it's happening on a flat surface we need to check for other possible problem. 

 

 

Regards,

-Jay 

Tourist
Posts: 5

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

I use 2 x SanDisk microSDXC 128GB Extreme Pro U3 V30

GoPro
Posts: 6,097

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

 

Thanks for letting us know @greenhero36067,

 

Please let us know if you'll encounter that on a flat surface as well without a sudden change on terrain. 

So that we can report that issue. 

 

 

 

Regards,

-Jay

Tourist
Posts: 5

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

For now, this has happened only once. If it happens again I will let you know.

 

Regards

GoPro
Posts: 27,018

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

 

Feel free to post back @greenhero36067

 

Thanks!

Ej

Explorer
Posts: 13,045

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

@greenhero36067

Might be a rolling shutter. A faster shutter might have avoided this.  While you have the fps set to 60, you also have Auto Low light on, meaning the camera can adjust to a lower fps in low light.  It's usually best to keep this setting off.  Your MAX ISO is 1600. which is good for a faster shutter and fps, but the MIN being at ISO 100 might have allowed the shutter to go too slow.  In environments like this, you might benefit from having a higher MIN ISO (200 might be OK, but 400 is probably best).  Doing so will prevent the shutter from dropping too slow in an attempt to use the lowest ISO.  Other options to try are fps - 60, Auto Low Light - OFF, Shutter Locked - 1/960 (can also try 1/480 or 1/240), Lowest ISO MIN/MAX possible, Sharpness -  Medium (personal preference, but High requires more in camera processing and can create too much contrast), Color - Flat (Again, personal preference for more detail in shadow).

 

In a screen grab, you can see the two images being written on the same frame due to high vibration and slow shutter

Rolling Shutter.jpg

Hiker
Posts: 48

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

Rolling shutter does not *ever* cause effects like this.   Rolling shutter creates skew during fast horizontal panning, compression or stretching during fast vertical panning and jello during high frequency vibration.   It does not cause violent shaking of the entire image when the camera is otherwise moving relatively slowly nor a weird rectangular block to appear only on the left side of the frame as visible in your screenshot.   And fast movement with too slow of a shutter speed causes motion blur, nothing more.

 

This looks like a less extreme version of the same issue reported in this thread

https://community.gopro.com/t5/Cameras/Hero-7-Black-Hypersmooth-failure-Super-glitchy-warped-footage...

And royalstorm0157  posted raw clips showing the same issue at the end of the same thread, including a sample that shows the same rectangular block on the left side of the image.     Have to download the video to see it clearly, but it's very clearly the same problem.

The two effects together represent a total failure of the EIS and image processing.    I sure hope *someone* at GoPro is taking the issue more seriously than what I've seen here so far. 

 

hero7-27k-stab-failure.png
Explorer
Posts: 13,045

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

@daemn42]

Your definition of rolling shutter is what is perceived when watching video with rolling shutter but not necessarily what is actually happening. 

 

Now, first of all, I never said that IT WAS rolling shutter, but that it, "Might be a rolling shutter".

 

Rolling shutter is the result of not having all parts of the image of the scene being recorded at exactly the same instant. The actual frame by frame can have wobble, skew, spatial ailiasing, and temporal aliasing. Having an image written on the same frame in two seperate locations, especially with high vibration/fast movement/SLOWER SHUTTER, is very common. The "violent shaking" is perceived.  The actual frame by frame shows the horizon doen't shake but is moved by the EIS to compensate for the impact and vibration. The hard impact, fast vibration, and sudden camera movement coupled with a slower shutter, allow for the forground image (arm and phone) to get written on the one frame twice in two seperate locations.  This, plus the actual vibration of the camera and subject, and the camera EIS adjusting the picture location to maintain a stable image, exagerates the "violent shaking". Once this happens, it appears that the camera EIS is trying to regain a stable frame with potentially continued rolling shutter adjustment issues. 

 

A faster shutter may have helped avoid the image being written twice on the same frame in two locations.

 

A faster fps (especially if the Auto low light dropped the fps to 30) might have given the EIS more frames to correct itself faster.

 

0jasonmullins.jpg5d_mark_iv_rolling_shutter-670x283.jpg.optimal.jpg3192314056_e0df39ed3c_z.jpgcrsp.pngdrone_img_02.jpgeis-explained.pnghqdefault.jpgimages (1).jpgimages.jpgpropeller.jpg

 

 

Hiker
Posts: 48

Re: Gopro Hero 7 2.7K60 stabilization problem?

[ New ]

All the artifacts in the images above occur because the movement in front of the camera is much faster than the CMOS sensor refresh rate, and is totally non-applicable to the situation described by the OP and those in the other thread I linked.    None of their videos show anything resembling your sample images. 

 

As I stated  (and you ignored) a rolling shutter does not EVER cause the entire frame to shake violtently at the same time.  In fact, by definition it is not possible because the entire frame is not captured at the same instant.  The only way the whole frame can move at once is if something is messing with it in post processing.. e.g.   Electronic Image Stabilization.

A rolling shutter does not EVER cause just one rectangular block in the same part of the frame to show something different than the entire rest of the frame over time, and for multiple cameras. 

Your assertion that it "might be a rolling shutter" is simply false, and only serves to obfuscate the true nature of the problem.