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Hiker
Posts: 12

GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

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Hi was just wondering if anyone is also having this same issue with there new hero9 . 

Looks like condensation/fog  behind the front screen.

 

The Screen has been like this since I've took it out of the box And this one hasn't been anywhere close to water yet.

 

As we are all aware trying to contact customer service is almost an impossible task that I've not managed to do yet..I've been trying now for over 2 weeks. Was just wondering if anyone is also having the same problems… I mean with the screen as I know allot of people having the same problems with the lack of CS from Gopro.

 

Thanks for your time

Peace Out

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Accepted Solutions
Nomad
Posts: 5,686

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Yeah well, I'm going to hunt down my physics teacher and shout at him "SEE!  I WAS PAYING ATTENTION IN CLASS!!!"

 

I actually got a cheap dive case to test and it came with a whole bunch of anti fog inserts, so that was pretty cool and I'll use them for this very purpose this winter.

 

Yes, any time the camera is opened or closed, if it's damp outside the camera (and dry inside the camera) the humidity level will always try to seek a balance.  You just don't realize how humid a place or environment can be until you see something like this.  I would put some desiccant packets in your pelican case and store your camera with the battery removed and door off.  It will help somewhat (although a lot of such cases have foam inserts to keep things snug and that can restrict airflow and drying).

 

As far as damaging your camera..... that's actually unlikely.  Against all common belief, water doesn't damage electronics....   yeah crazy I know, but let me explain.

 

What usually damages electronics is "shorting".  This is where enough moisture enters the electronics to form a bridge between circuits, at which point your battery or any bridged connections will short out the device.  This is why when electronics get wet, putting them in a bowl of rice is NOT the first thing you should do, it's actually removing the battery as quickly as possible.

Another thing (associated with water) is salt.  Salt + Water can lead to oxidisation (rusting) of electronics.  This usually happens if cheaper materials or solder is used in the creation of electronics.  So even if you don't immerse your electronics in water, exposing them to salt water environments (diving, windsurfing, photography near salt water environments) can indeed damage your electronics.  This is why (again against common belief) should your accidently drop your electronics in the ocean, the first thing you should do is remove the battery (to prevent shorting) and then try to wash off the components with deionized water (to remove salt water residue)(although you need to have a pretty good knowledge of what you are doing and how any liquid will affect your electronics). Then leave them to dry in a humidity controlled environment.

 

With your camera (and most Hero camera's) having moisture build up inside the camera isn't an indicator that it's soaking wet, but an indicator that there is "some" moisture present.  Don't forget, this is a very small amount of moisture, but due to heat vs cold, it's "condensing" at the nearest thermal transfer point (the glass in the display, just like the way your cars front windscreen gets fogged up).  

 

You don't want to let this get out of hand as eventually, droplets come together and form bigger drops, and that can lead to residue building up on the inside of the display (with no way to clean it off).  So you need to practise moisture abatement and management and make your camera's as dry as possible.  Hence the desiccant packets in your Pelican case and using your anti fog inserts to dry your camera (Tip, prepare the anti fog strips, put your camera with the door open and battery removed in a small lunch box, pop in the strips, close the lunchbox and there you have a moisture controlled drying environment).

 

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Hiker
Posts: 12

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

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Sightseer
Posts: 1

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]
Mine has started to do the same.
Hiker
Posts: 12

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Hi 

Thanks for letting me know.

 

Ive still been trying to get in touch with gopro about this for a answer but they always call back when im at work. 

If you hear anything mate can you let me know..vice versa if i do too.

 

Cheers.

Peace out

 

 

 

Nomad
Posts: 5,686

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Yes, that's what condensation behind your front screen looks like.  The best way to get rid of this is to enter a low humidity environment, open your camera and remove the battery, let your camera dry for while.  Then replace your battery, close the door and the condensation is gone.

 

Basically if you are in an environment with a high humidty level (this can be damp outside air, a humid area or room) and you open your camera to replace the battery, change SD card etc, you get moisture inside.  You may not even see such moisture but as soon as you enter a cold environment and turn on your camera, the moisture in your camera expands as it heats and where it meets colder air it will condense (in this case your front screen).  

 

This will become more of a problem as the days get cooler and more damp cool weather comes along.  Simply having a dedicated "dry room" on your house will do a lot to remove these issues when they happen.  It happens with a lot of camera gear, but as most camera's tend to be larger and not water proof, it's not as obvious.  But with smaller units that are water proof, they tend not to have a natural balancing effect for humidity and therefore condensation issues will happen.  

 

Should you not want to do the "dry room" method another simple thing you can do is get a dive case and defogging strips.  So when you see condensation like this forming, put your camera in the dive case, insert an anti fogging strip, remove the battery door and battery and reclose the dive case.  This will allow all moisture within the dive case (and therefore camera) to be absorbed by the anti fog strip.

Hiker
Posts: 12

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Hey Irishman 

 

Thank you very much for your message and explaining the what the issue is to me..thank you.

 

I still have some sealed anti fog strips my hero2 days many moons ago I used them also on the hero 3/4 when snowboarding as the camera used to fog up in the case with the heat and the outside cold. But I never knew this was possible to get it this in the camera behind the screen.  

 

I don't have a dive case for the gph9 but I do keep it in a sealed peli case with my other camera gear.  I will give your advise ago though, nice1.

Do you think this will be an issue in the future and damage the electronics in the camera if moisture is getting in this far?

 

Again i really appreciate your time and help...thanks mate

 

Peace out 

 

 

Nomad
Posts: 5,686

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Yeah well, I'm going to hunt down my physics teacher and shout at him "SEE!  I WAS PAYING ATTENTION IN CLASS!!!"

 

I actually got a cheap dive case to test and it came with a whole bunch of anti fog inserts, so that was pretty cool and I'll use them for this very purpose this winter.

 

Yes, any time the camera is opened or closed, if it's damp outside the camera (and dry inside the camera) the humidity level will always try to seek a balance.  You just don't realize how humid a place or environment can be until you see something like this.  I would put some desiccant packets in your pelican case and store your camera with the battery removed and door off.  It will help somewhat (although a lot of such cases have foam inserts to keep things snug and that can restrict airflow and drying).

 

As far as damaging your camera..... that's actually unlikely.  Against all common belief, water doesn't damage electronics....   yeah crazy I know, but let me explain.

 

What usually damages electronics is "shorting".  This is where enough moisture enters the electronics to form a bridge between circuits, at which point your battery or any bridged connections will short out the device.  This is why when electronics get wet, putting them in a bowl of rice is NOT the first thing you should do, it's actually removing the battery as quickly as possible.

Another thing (associated with water) is salt.  Salt + Water can lead to oxidisation (rusting) of electronics.  This usually happens if cheaper materials or solder is used in the creation of electronics.  So even if you don't immerse your electronics in water, exposing them to salt water environments (diving, windsurfing, photography near salt water environments) can indeed damage your electronics.  This is why (again against common belief) should your accidently drop your electronics in the ocean, the first thing you should do is remove the battery (to prevent shorting) and then try to wash off the components with deionized water (to remove salt water residue)(although you need to have a pretty good knowledge of what you are doing and how any liquid will affect your electronics). Then leave them to dry in a humidity controlled environment.

 

With your camera (and most Hero camera's) having moisture build up inside the camera isn't an indicator that it's soaking wet, but an indicator that there is "some" moisture present.  Don't forget, this is a very small amount of moisture, but due to heat vs cold, it's "condensing" at the nearest thermal transfer point (the glass in the display, just like the way your cars front windscreen gets fogged up).  

 

You don't want to let this get out of hand as eventually, droplets come together and form bigger drops, and that can lead to residue building up on the inside of the display (with no way to clean it off).  So you need to practise moisture abatement and management and make your camera's as dry as possible.  Hence the desiccant packets in your Pelican case and using your anti fog inserts to dry your camera (Tip, prepare the anti fog strips, put your camera with the door open and battery removed in a small lunch box, pop in the strips, close the lunchbox and there you have a moisture controlled drying environment).

 

Hiker
Posts: 12

Re: GoPro hero 9 (Front facing screen problems)

[ New ]

Hi again Irishman

 

Thanks again for your reply and also to your physics teacher. I think I owe both of yous a drink if you can find a place to get one that is.

 

Thats a great bit of info and again I really appreciate you taking the time and effort to write this ...thank you.

I have owned the GoPro h2 /h3b /h4b / h6b and now the h9b. i have never in the past had any condensation on the inside of the old front screens or external screen before like now but they weren't much a screen to be honest. mire like a old digital watch screen as you are aware this one is much different now and i think for me its going to be a big problem  the biggest problem as i use it for snowboarding and always have to replace the battery at one point in the day up the slopes so i don't know how i will manage to escape this happing again … unless the cold air wont allow the h9 to heat up so much as it does now..I'm not sure if this will make a difference? Ive noticed the h9 does get hot!..hotter than any of the previous ones I've had so far, maybe I'll just try to keep the front screen turned off as this might be the safest bet. 

 

Again I do really appreciate your advise and help mate… thank you so much for taking the time and if you ever find your old physics teacher and do shout at him also shout a thank you from me.

 

P.s. you should work for GoPro, Your advise was so helpful and much better than the outcome I received from them.

 

All the best for the future

Kind Regards 

Peace out